About

Thanks for visiting the BizEthics.org website.  I’d like to tell you a little bit about myself.
 
In 2002, I made the very difficult decision to close my company, Archwood, Inc. of Wooster, Ohio where for 20 years we were engaged in the business of making, restoring, and repairing wood furniture, as well as production woodworking.  It has always been important to me that businesses recognize the role that they play in the life of the community.  Archwood, Inc. had a strong sense of social mission and I decided after closing the business that this next phase of my life would be one in which I work to further corporate citizenship.  As a result, I enrolled at the University of Akron, and obtained a degree (August, 2005) in Philosophy, Political Science and Economics – P/P/E – as well as a minor in Business Administration, all with a personal emphasis on Corporate Social Responsibility.
 
For a number of years, I have been gathering a list of online resources that reflect my interests and concerns related to the issue of business ethics, corporate social responsibility, and environmental sustainability and I wanted to share them with you.  This is by no means a complete list, and admittedly much of it reflects my thinking about these matters – but hey, it’s my list!  Please feel free to send me any sites that you think should be added.
 
Jeff Miller

Curriculum Vital: Ethics Courses in Business Schools

Jeffrey A. Miller
Read the article here.

Excerpt:
In the summer of 2002, Congress passed new legislation, with more stringent requirements for corporate reporting of financial information. The level of attention and concern given to issues of corporate accountability has increased significantly, along with corresponding employment opportunities for those equipped to address these matters. With all of this in the works, one would expect that colleges and universities would be positioning themselves to train ethical leaders and provide a dependable supply to fulfill this commonly acknowledged need. However, individuals having those expectations are likely to be disappointed. Throughout the 1990’s and continuing to this day, institutes of higher learning in the United States have been and are dropping business ethics courses from their MBA programs. In some cases, ethics courses have been dropped from the requirements list, while at other schools, they are being dropped altogether. Now, more than ever, we need to include ethics in the business curriculum.

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“Capital” Punishment: For Corporations that Violate the Public Trust

Jeffrey A. Miller
(Your humble web servant)
Read the article here.
Excerpt:

How did corporations obtain this power? Is this the role that we envisioned for business entities in an economic democracy? In this paper, we will look at the history of corporations and their assumption of power that is incompatible with a free society. While we will consider a variety of views as to the proper role for corporate entities, the position of this paper should be clear. We need to reform the role of corporations in our country. We should consider placing limits on the duration of corporate charters, or conditions upon their renewal. States should exercise the responsibility that has always been theirs’ — the oversight of corporate activity. If the states are unwilling or unable to provide responsible oversight, we should consider removing their oversight power, and federalizing corporate charters. Finally, if we are going to consider the corporation to be a person and afford it the same kinds of rights and freedoms that are extended to the individual, perhaps it is time to revise the methods by which we hold the corporate “person” accountable. We should impose the same kind of punishments that we have established for individuals. If a corporation is convicted in the courts for a violation of law, we should curtail its freedom to conduct business for a period of time. In the event of repeat offenses, the penalties should be increased. In those instances where a corporation severely violates the public trust, it should cease to exist. The corporate charter should be revoked, the assets seized and the corporation dissolved.

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